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Staff overview

In 2011-12 staff numbers stabilised in comparison to the previous year, when a sharp increase in complaints caused the TIO to address demand by hiring more staff. As at 30 June 2012, we had 264 employees, of which 52 per cent are male and 48 per cent are female. The majority of our workforce (81 per cent) works full time.

New teams

Some new teams were created to assist in delivering the TIO strategy for 2012-15, in accordance to our vision and roles. These teams will allow us to put in place continuous improvement practices to our systems, develop our staff’s skills, better engage with our stakeholders, ensure the quality of our work and contribute to improved complaint handling in the telecommunications industry.

TIO organisational structure

View our organisational chart.

Wellness program

Our People and Development team organises a year-long program of wellness activities for our staff. These are aimed at helping them maintain their physical and mental wellbeing by promoting healthy eating, physical activity, budgeting, healthy relationships and keeping their health in check. Some of the activities done this year included:

  • Hearing health tests
  • Quit smoking seminars
  • 10,000 Steps Challenge
  • Healthy eating cooking demonstrations
  • Budgeting workshops
  • WorkHealth consultations

Marco’s complaint

Marco's complaint

Marco called us about being default listed for a $1,900 phone debt he claimed he had no knowledge of.

He told us that he only became aware of the default listing when he applied for a mortgage, which was rejected on the grounds of having a bad credit rating. He claimed he had never received notification from his provider about the default and he had been living at the same address for the last two years.

After our initial referral of his complaint, the service provider told him that the default listing was accurate and would not be removed. Marco was dissatisfied with this outcome and contacted us again.

When we conciliated the complaint, we got in touch with Marco’s service provider, which showed us records of their correspondence and dealings with him. That correspondence showed that Marco had been sent a letter advising him an original debt of $2,100. The records also showed that he had responded to this by contacting the service provider to negotiate a payment arrangement of $100 per fortnight.

Marco had honoured the payments for the first two fortnights, which reduced the debt to $1,900, but did not make any more payments for five months. The provider then sent him a notification that he would be default listed. After the default notice had been issued, Marco began to make payments again and paid the debt off over the following six months.

After assessing this information, we came to the decision that Marco’s provider had followed the appropriate credit management steps in the lead up to the default listing. Marco had been aware of the debt, had organised a payment arrangement that he didn’t adhere to and as a consequence, was default listed. Also, as Marco had known about the debt for more than two years before coming to the TIO, we could not look at the appropriateness of the debt.

Based on the evidence provided, we exercised our discretion to not consider the complaint further.

Marco’s complaint

Marco's complaint

Marco called us about being default listed for a $1,900 phone debt he claimed he had no knowledge of.

He told us that he only became aware of the default listing when he applied for a mortgage, which was rejected on the grounds of having a bad credit rating. He claimed he had never received notification from his provider about the default and he had been living at the same address for the last two years.

After our initial referral of his complaint, the service provider told him that the default listing was accurate and would not be removed. Marco was dissatisfied with this outcome and contacted us again.

When we conciliated the complaint, we got in touch with Marco’s service provider, which showed us records of their correspondence and dealings with him. That correspondence showed that Marco had been sent a letter advising him an original debt of $2,100. The records also showed that he had responded to this by contacting the service provider to negotiate a payment arrangement of $100 per fortnight.

Marco had honoured the payments for the first two fortnights, which reduced the debt to $1,900, but did not make any more payments for five months. The provider then sent him a notification that he would be default listed. After the default notice had been issued, Marco began to make payments again and paid the debt off over the following six months.

After assessing this information, we came to the decision that Marco’s provider had followed the appropriate credit management steps in the lead up to the default listing. Marco had been aware of the debt, had organised a payment arrangement that he didn’t adhere to and as a consequence, was default listed. Also, as Marco had known about the debt for more than two years before coming to the TIO, we could not look at the appropriateness of the debt.

Based on the evidence provided, we exercised our discretion to not consider the complaint further.